Thai Durian Sale at the Wellcome Supermarket in Causeway Bay

We had a crazy day at IKEA. But that’s usually how it is on a Saturday afternoon. The only comfort I had was that a good 30% of the shoppers were stuck at Sogo’s “Thankful Week” madhouse sale. 

I’d popped in to Wellcome (block between Sogo and IKEA) just before our trip to IKEA to buy a pack of chocolate milk for the small person. While in the queue to pay, I spotted an indoor  durian stall. The staff were busy ripping up the durian husks and re-packaging the flesh into plastic boxes. 

It didn’t smell at all…“you can only do this with Thai durian, I thought. 

Sure enough, it was Thai durian that looked pretty good. The flesh was a rich golden hue and the packaging looked robust. Those packers did a good job. 


The lack of any aroma or scent was a deal breaker for me. I’m a nose-y person and if it doesn’t smell good then I’m much less inclined to try it. 


It was the first time that I’ve seen a sign in the supermarket warning customers about the spikes.. Though it’s so small and below line of sight that I doubt anyone would really notice.

Uh Oh.. Trouble with the durian pastries at Goodwood Park Hotel, Singapore

TW’s favourite durian go to location for durian sweets is in the news again, unfortunately not in a good way.

Here’s the headline…
Goodwood Park bakery licence suspended after 76 food poisoning cases linked to durian pastries 

  

  
Hope they figure out the issue(s) and sort it out soon. 

Nicely designed dried durian packaging

Most packaging for durians look somewhat cheesy, in the sense that the picture of the durian is too perfect and often placed in a traditional pose on an aluminium foil packet. I liked the play on the fonts and the very bark like colours chosen for the background.

  
This Thai manufacturer actually invested a little more thought and design into their product package and even touts durian benefits… Although this claim is not exclusive to durian alone. 

   

 I didn’t buy it though. Can’t bring myself to handle the disappointment of eating Thai durian😉.

Durian mochis from a famous mochi chain in Wan Chai

Since the last entry about the new durian dessert shop on Queen’s Road East, I’ve always noticed a steady stream of clientele throughout the day buying mochis of various flavours. 

The shop appears to be doing well.

A friend, DC, came by Wan Chai yesterday  to say hello. She brought me the mochis as a gift, saying that these mochis were super famous and delicious. 

  
They were very soft, these mochis, not too sticky and had the texture of mildly chewy marshmallows. 

  
The durian filling in the mochi was smooth and without a trace of fiber. It tasted like durian that was blended. The aroma was mild, the flavour palate was also mild. 

  
The peanut mochi was more intense in flavour. It was more textured with the crunchiness of the peanut and the sugar.

Overall, I’d say it’s worth a try but durian-wise it’s not going to satisfy your cravings.:)

Thanks DC for our desserts, they kept us full for the rest of the day and we didn’t even need dinner.

If you need a mochi, look for the shop at the corner of Swatow street and Queen’s Road East. 

A splendid durian for San Francisco friends

SM & MM informed us about their visit to Hong Kong for a short trip of two days we were extremely excited. I inquired whether there was anything that they wanted me to purchase in advance.

MM said she wanted my help to get some creams for her (cheaper here than US) and some Si Chuan tofu which I introduced her to last time she was here. What else?

  
So it was an All Caps emphatic YES to durian

I’ve been walking past our durian seller daily and noticed a constant display of durian. Curious, I thought as it is now off peak for all durians, including our favourite Mao Shan Wang

The boss’s wife revealed to me that they have a special arrangement with two farms in Pahang who send them whatever falls from their trees, and now was the best time to eat it as it was at its most flavourful. I was a little suspicious but this fruit seller does get the best fruit in all of WanChai, durian included. 

Now MM’s visit presented the most wonderful opportunity to buy one to try. Due to its price, our little household will only buy it as a treat😉.

So on a Saturday evening, after we had spent much of the day walking and enjoying the rare, fine sunshine,  I returned to the fruit shop at 6.30pm to collect the durian I had asked them to reserve earlier. 

The boss pulled it out of the polystyrene box and presented it to me. 

“Lots of flesh this one” he said.

“You sure it’s good?” I asked.

“Definitely good. Guaranteed it’s good!” He confirmed very confidently. 

He popped it on the weighing machine. It was 3.1Kg. “400” he said. “Special price.”

So the deal was struck and he asked whether we wanted it opened and boxed, or we could take it in the shell which would be better.

  
After some deliberation, we decided in shell was probably fine. As long as he did the initial split for us. He left the rubber band on the end and wrapped it carefully in the spongy packaging material then popped it into a little bag. It seemed smaller once I had it in my hands, but well, good durian often feels that way.

I left it at home on the dining table and proceeded out to dinner. During dinner, we intentionally ate a little less to save room for durian.

Here are some photos of our delicious fruit when opened.

   
 You can see that it was a beautifully symmetrical fruit shell, all the better for good fruit contained within. The flesh was a lovely golden yellow and was the perfect texture, not wet and not too dry.

My first bite revealed a slightly fermented champagney sort of flavour which was interesting. The second seed I had from the other side of the shell was of a different taste altogether, more nutty, less of the fermented taste. Isn’t it interesting that the flavours in one fruit can vary so much. It’s nice to be able to discern these flavours, as opposed to eating items made with durian paste, which while tasty, are uniform and not tempting enough for the second dose.

  
We thoroughly enjoyed this durian, eating roughly 4-5 seeds between us before we declared that we could eat no more. 

Worth it? 

YES!

(And so much more pleasurable eating with friends)

Durian chocolate at Changi Terminal 1

If you’re at Changi Terminal 1 waiting for your delayed Jetstar flight like I was a few weeks ago, you might see this shop selling chocolates.

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One of the prominent products on display are the durian chocolates.

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It was freeze dried durian that had a chocolate outer coating. I thought that the packaging was not very attractive. It didn’t make me think that either the durian or the chocolate was high quality.

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Others probably share this sentiment as the shop had a promotion of giving one box free if you buy four boxes.., hmm you really have to love the stuff.

Ironically it’s sold with the tag line “Flavours of Singapore”. The durian was most certainly not from Singapore. They may do better if they state it’s breed or species or better still, allow people to try them before purchase. That’ll be the ultimate clincher if it’s good.

Chinese New Year Durian Festivities

How could we return to Singapore and not have durians

It is off peak and durians are frighteningly expensive for the quality that is available. So……

First up, durian mochi dessert at a chinese restaurant after a fantastic Chinese New Year feast. Round smooth pale balls of fragrant pleasure…, aaaaah.

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The inside looks and pretty much IS the real thing…

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After the mochi (only one each), we had chinese oranges, pineapple tarts and fruits. But the durian mochi was hands down the best.

And they are available at the Jade Seafood restaurant in Forum Galleria pretty much all year round.