Chinese New Year Durian Festivities

How could we return to Singapore and not have durians

It is off peak and durians are frighteningly expensive for the quality that is available. So……

First up, durian mochi dessert at a chinese restaurant after a fantastic Chinese New Year feast. Round smooth pale balls of fragrant pleasure…, aaaaah.

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The inside looks and pretty much IS the real thing…

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After the mochi (only one each), we had chinese oranges, pineapple tarts and fruits. But the durian mochi was hands down the best.

And they are available at the Jade Seafood restaurant in Forum Galleria pretty much all year round.

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It’s a durian mochi shop

The vendors that took over the Tai Tai Pie Pie space on Queens Road East in Wan Chai is now a mochi shop that sells a few popular flavours, one of which is durian

The shop decor looks very simple (with fluorescent quite unattractive lighting in my opinion) and displays the oval shaped floured goods in white plastic tray-like boxes. 

 

Promoted flavours are mango and durian

   
While I was there mid afternoon, a few curious tourists and a local bought the peanut mochi. Judging by the trays, that was the most popular one. The durian mochi tray was still full. 

    
Not sure if they’re any good. I like tong yun but am less of a fan of mochi. 

These palm sized morsels sell for 15 HKD each but there was no obvious smells emanating from the shop even without packaging…. Perhaps it isn’t really good durian they’re using… The smell of Mao Shan Wang flesh permeates everything.

Durian Daifuku

I was walking towards home today when I decided to check out a frozen meat shop. Ah Wong Fine Food Company. Despite its name, it isn’t a gourmet shop as much as a gourmet stall… An impressive number of freezers packed into a very tight corner. The last time I walked by, there were some impressive listings of imported meat and seafood, at cheaper prices then what you can get at the supermarket.

  
These shops paste sheets of A4 paper- often hand written- of what the item is and the price by weight. 

I bought some imported beef slices and as I was leaving, spotted this:

  
What on earth was that? I wondered. Since I was already a client, I was less shy about asking. 

Boss, I said in my crappy Cantonese, what is durian daifuku?

The boss replied in Cantonese, it’s something you eat and drink.

???

I persisted: Is it frozen? 
Yes he said. 

Well can I see it? I want to know what it is. Where is it from?
It’s from Malaysia he replied. 

Then scrabbling around a freezer in front of me, yanked out this box.

  
Ah. Durian mochi. Made from pure durian pulp. Apparently haven for durian lovers.. Do they mean heaven? 

I thanked him and told him to put it back. The meat I had bought would thaw nicely on the way home in time for lunch. The durian mochis will be for another time. 

It’s just hilarious that they made it sound Japanese… In chinese characters it says Da Fu or Dai Fu in Cantonese (meaning big wealth) but they added a ku on the end of it.

45 Hkd per box isn’t much, less than 7USD. For 8pcs, that works out to be less than 1USD per piece (or bite). It doesn’t state what type of durian it’s made of. I’ve paid more for an ice cream stick so maybe this might be worth a go.